HISTORIC DISTRICT TOUR

Asian Pacific Historic District Walking Tour

Second Saturday of each month | 11:00am-12:00pm
Cost: Free with $5 Museum Admission 

On the second Saturday of each month from 11a.m.-12p.m., hear from Amie Lee Garapich for FREE about the early history of the Museum downtown area in the late 1880’s and 1890’s. You will learn about pertinent places that are original and still in existence, such as the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association and the Quin Residence. These recollections are important to the Chinese and San Diego community because they relate to a history that might be lost without these recollections. Amie will tell her experiences to bridge the cultural gap between the Chinatown and the Asian Pacific Historic District of the past and present.

Here is a message from Amie Lee Garapich about the Asian Pacific Historic District Tour: 

My maiden name is Amie Faylan Lee and I carry out exciting tours of the Asian-Pacific Historic District on the second Saturday of every month at 11:00 a.m.

I am half-Chinese and half-English.  My dad was born in Ipoh, Malaya, where his parents came from Quangdong, China to work in the tin mines.  I was born in Chula Vista, and have lived in the San Diego area for my entire life.

In the 1940’s and ‘50’s, when I was young, I would visit San Diego’s Chinatown with my dad at least once a week to go to Woo Chee Chong’s.  My father, who did much of the cooking in the house, wanted to have fresh Chinese food staples, like meat, bok choy, and tofu.  At the time, Woo Chee Chong was the only Chinese market in San Diego.  I attended Chinese language school at least twice a week, in the building that is now the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum (at the time, it was known as the Chinese Community Church). Many of the children that attended the language school lived in the Chinatown area.  It was my way of connecting with the community and learning the language.

During the first part of my tour, I discuss the early history of the area, starting in the late 1880’s and 1890’s.  All along the walk, I will point out pertinent places that are original and still operating, like the Chinese Historical Museum, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, and the Quin residence.  I will also point out those places which are no longer in existence, such as cafes and laundries, but which I remember, and give you my recollections.

I feel that these recollections are important to the Chinese and San Diego community, because they relate a part of history that might be lost. I want to share some of my experience with others to bridge the cultural gap between the Chinatown of the past and the Asian-Pacific Historic District of the present.

If you have questions about this tour, please contact education at education@sdchm.org or call 619.338.9888.