ONGOING EXHIBITIONS

Ongoing Events

Docent-led Museum & Garden Tour

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Every first Saturday of the month, 11:00am – 12:00pm

Enjoy a docent-led tour of the San Diego Chinese Historical Museum’s permanent collection and featured exhibit!  Museum tours are held the first Saturday of every month at 11:00am.  Space is limited and reservations are required. Please RSVP by 3:30pm on the Friday prior to the tour by calling the museum at 619-338-9888.  The tour is included with museum admission. For more information, please contact the museum at 619.338.9888 or at info@sdchm.org.

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Asian Pacific Historic District Walking Tour

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Every second Saturday of the month, 11:00am – 12:30pm

Explore Old Chinatown and the Japanese and Filipino neighborhoods in San Diego’s old Stingaree red light district. The tour is co-sponsored by the Asian Pacific Historic Collaborative. Space is limited and reservations are required. Please RSVP by 3:30pm on the Friday prior to the walking tour by calling the museum at 619-338-9888. $4.00 per adult. For more information, please contact the museum.

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3rd Saturday Lectures

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Every third Saturday of the month, 11:00am – 12:00pm

Explore intriguing aspects of Chinese arts, culture, and history in a series of lectures with Senior Coordinator of Education and Exhibits Alex Stewart. Nine years preparing exhibits and education programs at SDCHM and seven years of graduate research in sociocultural anthropology at UCSD has given Mr. Stewart a wide range of expertise, and now he is eager to share this with the public. Many of these presentations feature original research on museum artifacts or firsthand ethnographic accounts from China.  Space is limited and reservations are required. Please RSVP by 3:30pm on the Friday prior to the lecture by calling the museum at 619-338-9888.  $5.oo for adults, free for members, children under 12, and students with valid ID. For more information, please contact the museum at 619.338.9888 or at info@sdchm.org.

UPCOMING LECTURES:

Feb. 20: Chinese Painting 101: Ten Paintings Everyone Should Know, special lecture with Tiffany Wai Wing Beres, Associate Director of SDCHM | While oil painting is central to art history in the West, it has a very limited history of sixty years in China, dating back only to the Soviet realist school of painting. On the other hand, ink painting is one of China’s oldest and most highly respected art forms, with a history of more than 2,000 years. In fact, ink painting, works made from brush and ink (often color) on paper or silk, is known as guohua (literally “national painting”) and shares its artistic roots and traditions with Chinese calligraphy, another highly prized art form. Chinese Painting 101 will condense the history of Chinese painting into a one-hour interactive talk focusing on ten masterworks that everyone should know in order to better appreciate the Chinese ink painting genre.

March 19: Eunuchs, Scholars, and Concubines: Palace Intrigues of the Han Dynasty 漢朝 | The imperial system established in the Qin 秦(221-206 BCE) and Han (206 BCE-220 CE) Dynasties lasted until the twentieth century, but it was not without internal conflicts. Eunuchs, concubines, and other members of the emperor’s inner court exploited their proximity to the throne, undermining the bureaucracy of scholar-officials in the outer court. This tension between inner and outer courts created an adversarial system of informal checks and balances between the emperor and his bureaucrats, but sometimes it allowed usurpers to exert untrammeled control over weak emperors. Throughout Chinese history, Confucian historians decry the corrupting influence of eunuchs and concubines, but this talk will illustrate that judging their contributions is not quite that simple.

April 16: An Introduction to Chinese Contemporary Art, special lecture with Tiffany Wai Wing Beres, Associate Director of SDCHM | The rapid economic and cultural transformation of China during the past thirty years has created an art scene of unparalleled energy and global impact. Throwing off restrictions on subject matter, embracing a new freedom to experiment, but also preserving and expressing Chinese identity on a monumental scale, contemporary Chinese art has enjoyed an astonishing surge of commercial and critical success. Associate Director of the SDCHM, Tiffany Wai-Ying Beres, a contemporary art curator who has lived in China for the past decade, will explain the origins of contemporary art in China in the context of the whirlwind changes in the country’s social and political environment as well as introduce the oeuvre of some the most important artists living in China today.

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